Economic Development Research Group Blog

Resilience Economics in Action: The Example of US-101 in California

US101_blog_cover_photo Credit: Caltrans District 1
Capture-blog_resilience_AW_tables.JPG
Many MPO’s and state DOT’s are beginning to assess not only their vulnerability to transportation system failures caused by natural disasters and weather-related events, but also the wider economic consequences of potential future infrastructure system failures.  As such events may increase in frequency with aging facilities and climate change, understanding the economic consequences of these events should be at the core of any resiliency analysis.  To address this issue, two fundamental questions need to be considered: What are the economic consequences of failures in a transportation system caused by weather or other natural disaster events? What cost-effective transportation solutions can best avoid, mitigate, or quickly respond to these potential failures? Quantifying the scale of economic losses due to a disruption in the transportation system highlights how much of the economy is exposed to natural or weather-related disasters.  This assessment can be used as a benchmark to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of various...
Continue reading
  47 Hits
47 Hits

ROAD PRICING MAY BE COMING: ECONOMISTS ARE ON BOARD, BUT WILL THE PUBLIC BE CONVINCED?

car-traffic-shutterstock_33044002
ElectricVehsCharging.jpg
Most people seem to agree with a “user-pays” principle for transportation infrastructure, especially for roads and highways. The fuel excise tax on gasoline and diesel has long been the primary source of federal and state transportation revenues. While economists have long advocated for other types of fees, transportation professionals, policymakers, politicians and even the public have just recently become more active in pricing discussions. A number of trends in transportation technology and behavior have launched this discussion, which was strongly evident this year at the TRB Annual Meeting. A lot of work that I shared at TRB this year considers how revenue policies might respond to the following trends and what the impacts of those revenue policies would be on household contribution to transportation funding in urban and rural areas respectively. Trend 1: Fuel Efficiency and Electrification. The most recent CAFE standards will significantly increase the fuel efficiency of the fleet,...
Continue reading
  170 Hits
170 Hits

Rural Accessibility

shutterstock_1234585066-1
There are more remote regions in the country, but the Appalachian Region with its population of 25 million is unique in the way that it is comparatively populous, within reach of large metropolitan areas of the East and yet is still isolated in many parts. Poverty in Appalachia was ubiquitous when President Johnson signed legislation to make federal funds available to develop the Appalachian Region. The construction of the Appalachian Development Highway System (ADHS) has since been one of the major efforts to overcome economic distress in the region. The relationship between poor access to markets and the lack of economic opportuni-ties has been well known for a long time. With the ADHS nearing its completion and highway accessibility widely improved, economic distress and its consequences remain a prevalent issue in some parts of Appalachia, reinforced by the nation’s evolving economy. The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) has therefore started a project...
Continue reading
  343 Hits
343 Hits

Latest Blogposts

Twitter Feed

Resilience Economics in Action: The Example of US-101 in California https://t.co/5AUZYamrE6
RT @city_viewer: What is the role for cities in replacing the gas tax? | Smart Cities Dive https://t.co/WqSKOH7kGo #RUC #transportfinance
The Case for Forward-Looking Energy Program Evaluations https://t.co/n7uZkz7i3e
twitter 2 linkedin 2
 

Telephone: 1-617-338-6775 - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

© 1997-2019 Economic Development Research Group, Inc; 155 Federal St. 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02110 USA